A Quiet Place Will Make You Scream

So, technically, we didn’t see this movie together, because Bryan isn’t a horror movie fan, but I really wanted to write a review anyway!

When I first saw the teaser trailer for A Quiet Place, I wasn’t all that impressed. Honestly, I thought the concept of a family that has to remain all but silent so they don’t provoke attacks by some audio-motivated “they” seemed like an excuse to make a film full of superficial jump scares and little else. I tucked the upcoming film into the “Meh, maybe on Netflix someday” category in my brain, and that was that.

However, when A Quiet Place became a Rotten Tomatoes darling and word began to circulate that it was actually a great movie, I decided to give it a chance. I left my lukewarm impressions in the dust and met my horror movie partner in crime, Nikki, at an AMC for a weeknight showing. We armed ourselves with root beer, peanut M&Ms, and all the hope in the world that writer, director, and actor John Krasinski wouldn’t let us down.

He didn’t.

Seeing A Quiet Place in a proper movie theater is a ridiculously enjoyable experience. If you like monster movies, go now!

*Before I proceed and fangirl about everything I loved about this movie, here’s your warning. While I hate spoilers and will keep them to an absolute minimum, I really do think you should see A Quiet Place before you read the rest of this…and then we can compare notes and geek out over this horror film together.

Okay, I’ve been thinking a lot about why I loved A Quiet Place so much, and it’s because the movie is such a fun experience. Here’s what made it stand out for me.

This movie has so much heart. You remember how I was afraid this film would feel like a superficial fear bomb? And that jump scares would reign supreme? Okay, there are a few jump scares, but there are quite a few moments and scenes that hit you harder (right in the gut, to be honest) thanks to their emotional resonance. And that is the golden element that drives the plot of A Quiet Place forward and allows viewers to connect with the main characters on a visceral level. This family isn’t perfect or immediately likable or without their flaws. While defending themselves from bloodthirsty creatures that want to feed on their flesh, they’re also struggling to make their family unit work. And you thought Christmas dinner with your family was rough.

Without getting into major plot points, this movie tackles some deep emotion themes, including grief, loss, and guilt, while also keeping you on the edge of your seat, because the threat is real. In A Quiet Place, Krasinski has struck a really brilliant balance between sweet moments, hard-to-watch family interactions, and straight-up survival instinct fear. It doesn’t seem like it while you’re in the theater, but you go through a lot in 95 minutes. And it’s all enjoyable and beautiful and downright scary in equal measure.

The sheer quiet of the film is actually pretty unnerving and cool…if you have a theater of moviegoers who are invested and along for the ride. When Nikki and I arrived, right in time for the lights to dim and the trailers to start, our theater was packed. We were lucky to snag a couple seats on the far end in the second row, and I immediately began to wonder what this experience would be like, what with the theater being so full. Would the silent moments of the movie actually be quite loud, thanks to moviegoers jostling bags of popcorn, slurping sodas, and making comments to their friends?

Surprisingly, no. There was this interesting thing phenomenon that occurred as soon as A Quiet Place began. Our movie theater became a quiet place, too. It was like everyone was collectively holding their breath and trying to make as little noise as possible. And thank goodness, because the silent moments of the film build this incredibly taut ambiance that’s paper thin and relies on, strangely enough, everyone’s participation. I love that this movie was able to evoke that interesting response in the audience, this desire to go along for the ride and to remain quiet, like the characters onscreen. (I will say, if you go to a theater where folks aren’t respectful or bought in, it will probably suck.)

And while much of the movie was intensely quiet, there were many moments that weren’t. And the noise wasn’t just used to provoke monsters. I mean, sure, you need sound as an impetus for the attacks, so crashes and the like were a given, but there’s really great use of music and natural sounds from the environment that build layers of emotion and also help to keep the prolonged silences from feeling stifling and too intense. Silence builds tension; noise brings release…and much-needed opportunity to discreetly reach into your super-loud-and-crinkly bag of M&Ms for a treat.

And don’t get me started about the noises the monsters make. They were a highlight of the film for me, because they were deeply nostalgic. No, not from my nightmares. Funny enough, from Disney World.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIf you’re a horror junkie like me and visited the Magic Kingdom between 1995 and 2002, you likely went on a “ride” called ExtraTERRORestrial Alien Encounter. And it likely scared the shit out of you.

A high-level rundown of the experience: park goers were invited into a theater in the round to witness a teleportation demonstration by a futuristic company called X-S Tech. And yes, we were strapped into harnesses and restraints for the demonstration, because precautions, right? During the demo, something goes horribly wrong, and instead of teleporting a human scientist into the room with us, the scientists of X-S Tech accidentally teleport an alien. Oops.

And that’s when shit gets real. The lights go out. We hear the sound of shattering glass. A security guard comes in to intervene…but he screams, and we hear the alien chomping on his bones. (Bye, Steve.) And then, the alien is lurking among us, looking for its next snack. Thanks to surround sound, water effects, and rumbling chairs, you really felt like the alien was there, breathing down your neck, ready to kill you, which ignited all sorts of delicious adrenaline in your body.

Here’s a more detailed account of the ride, if you never experienced it, or if you’d like to conjure up your own memories.

Disney deemed the attraction “too scary” in the early 2000s, and now it’s a Lilo and Stitch-themed experience, which makes my little horror-loving heart sad…but back to A Quiet Place.

I know it’s a weirdly twisted thing to admit, but when all hell breaks loose and the creatures descend upon the family in A Quiet Place, I found myself grinning. Not because the family was in peril (that part sucked!), but because the noises the monsters made were so damn familiar. They sounded like the noises the “escaped alien” made in ExtraTERRORestrial Alien Encounter.

Thanks to the surround sound in our movie theater, I was transported back to Disney World and to one of my favorite theater experiences ever. That nostalgic moment? Just priceless. Thank you, awesome sound effects team.

The movie features a deaf character, and Krasinski pushed to hire a deaf actress to fill the role. And it was the right call, because Millicent Simmonds is simply captivating onscreen. She’s expressive and emotional, and her presence brings a lot of authenticity to the film. I read that she taught the cast and crew American Sign Language during the production of this movie, and I think that’s exceptionally rad. It’s so nice to see a push for inclusion and diversity, not only in storytelling and script writing, but in the casting of actors, too. I really respect Krasinski for finding and hiring Simmonds.

I also can’t wait to see what she stars in next, and I’m gonna have to watch Wonderstruck, too.

Okay, there’s so much more I could say about this movie, but I like to keep this blog a spoiler-free zone. That being said, the comments section is fair game. What did you love about A Quiet Place?